Turnkey APMaaS by AppDynamics

Since we launched our Managed Service Provider program late last year, we’ve signed up many MSPs that were interested in adding Application Performance Management-as-a-Service (APMaaS) to their service catalogs.  Wouldn’t you be excited to add a service that’s easy to manage but more importantly easy to sell to your existing customer base?

Service providers like Scicom definitely were (check out the case study), because they are being held responsible for the performance of their customer’s complex, distributed applications, but oftentimes don’t have visibility inside the actual application.  That’s like being asked to officiate an NFL game with your eyes closed.

ref

The sad truth is that many MSPs still think that high visibility in app environments equates to high configuration, high cost, and high overhead.

Thankfully this is 2013.  People send emails instead of snail mail, play Call of Duty instead of Pac-Man, listen to Pandora instead of cassettes, and can have high visibility in app environments with low configuration, low cost, and low overhead with AppDynamics.

Not only do we have a great APM service to help MSPs increase their Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR), we make it extremely easy for them to deploy this service in their own environments, which, to be candid, is half the battle.  MSPs can’t spend countless hours deploying a new service.  It takes focus and attention away from their core business, which in turn could endanger the SLAs they have with their customers.  Plus, it’s just really annoying.

Introducing: APMaaS in a Box

Here at AppDynamics, we take pride in delivering value quickly.  Most of our customers go from nothing to full-fledged production performance monitoring across their entire environment in a matter of hours in both on-premise and SaaS deployments.  MSPs are now leveraging that same rapid SaaS deployment model in their own environments with something that we like to call ‘APMaaS in a Box’.

At a high level, APMaaS in a Box is large cardboard box with air holes and a fragile sticker wherein we pack a support engineer, a few management servers, an instruction manual, and a return label…just kidding…sorry, couldn’t resist.

man in box w sticker

Simply put, APMaaS in a Box is a set of files and scripts that allows MSPs to provision multi-tenant controllers in their own data center or private cloud and provision AppDynamics licenses for customers themselves…basically it’s the ultimate turnkey APMaaS.

By utilizing AppDynamics’ APMaaS in a Box, MSPs across the world are leveraging our quick deployment, self-service license provisioning, and flexibility in the way we do business to differentiate themselves and gain net new revenue.

Quick Deployment

Within 6 hours, MSPs like NTT Europe who use our APMaaS in a Box capabilities will have all the pieces they need in place to start monitoring the performance of their customer’s apps.  Now that’s some rapid time to value!

Self-Service License Provisioning

MSPs can provision licenses directly through the AppDynamics partner portal.  This gives you complete control over who gets licenses and makes it very easy to manage this process across your customer base.

Flexibility

A MSP can get started on a month-to-month basis with no commitment.  Only paying for what you sell eliminates the cost of shelfware.  MSPs can also sell AppDynamics however they would like to position it and can float licenses across customers.  NTT Europe uses a 3-tier service offering so customers can pick and choose the APM services they’d like to pay for.  Feel free to get creative when packaging this service for customers!

Conclusion

As more and more MSPs move up the stack from infrastructure management to monitoring the performance of their customer’s distributed applications, choosing an APM partner that understands the Managed Services business is of utmost importance.  AppDynamics’ APMaaS in a box capabilities align well with internal MSP infrastructures, and our pricing model aligns with the business needs of Managed Service Providers – we’re a perfect fit.

MSPs who continue to evolve their service offerings to keep pace with customer demands will be well positioned to reap the benefits and future revenue that comes along with staying ahead of the market.  To paraphrase The Great One, MSPs need to “skate where the puck is going to be, not where it has been.”  I encourage all you MSPs out there to contact us today to see how we can help you skate ahead of the curve and take advantage of the growing APM market with our easy to use, easy to deploy APMaaS in a Box.  If you don’t, your competition will…

AppDynamics & Splunk – Better Together

AppD & Splunk LogoA few months ago I saw an interesting partnership announcement from Foursquare and OpenTable.  Users can now make OpenTable reservations at participating restaurants from directly within the Foursquare mobile app.  My first thought was, “What the hell took you guys so long?” That integration makes sense on so many levels, I’m surprised it hadn’t already been done.

So when AppDynamics recently announced a partnership with Splunk, I viewed that as another no-brainer.  Two companies with complementary solutions making it easier for customers to use their products together – makes sense right?  It does to me, and I’m not alone.

I’ve been demoing a prototype of the integration for a few months now at different events across the country, and at the conclusion of each walk-through I’d get some variation of the same question, “How do I get my hands on this?”  Well, I’m glad to say the wait is over – the integration is available today as an App download on Splunkbase.  You’ll need a Splunk and AppDynamics license to get started – if you don’t already have one, you can sign up for free trials of Splunk and AppDynamics online.

Black Friday and Cyber Monday thru the eyes of an APM solution

A week has passed since Black Friday, so I thought it would be a good idea to summarise what we saw at AppDynamics from monitoring one of several e-commerce applications in production.

Firstly, things went pretty well for our customers who experienced between 300 and 500% increase in transaction volume over the holiday period on their applications. Thats a pretty big spike in traffic for any application so its always good to look at those spikes and see what impact they had on application performance.

Here’s a screenshot which shows the load (top) and response time (bottom) of a major e-commerce production application during the thanksgiving period. The dotted line in both charts represents the dynamic baseline of normal activity. You can see on Black Friday (23rd) and Cyber Monday (26th) that transaction throughput was peaking between 24,000 and 31,000 tpm on the application, spiking between 150 and 200% over the normal load the application experiences throughput the rest of the year.

Application response time during the period had one blip during the first minutes of Black Friday (9pm PCT/Midnight EST) with no major performance issues following thru into Cyber Monday. The blip in the application related to the web container thread pool becoming exhausted during peak load when the Black Friday promotions went live. Below you can see throughput was hitting 23,000 tpm.

Two business transactions “Product Display” and “Checkout” were breaching their performance baselines during that period. Looking at the average response times of 516ms and 733ms tells one story, looking at the maximum response time and number of slow/very slow transactions (calculated using SD) tells a completely different story.

Let’s take a look at the execution of one individual “Product Display” business transaction that was classified as very slow with a 66 second response time.

When we drill into the code execution and SQL activity we can see a simple SELECT SQL query had a response time of 588ms, the problem in this transaction was that this query was invoked 102 times resulting in a whopping 59.9 seconds of latency, its therefore no surprise that thread concurrency inside the JVM was high waiting for transactions like these to complete. If these queries are simply pulling back product data then there is no reason why a distributed cache can’t be used to store the data instead of expensive calls to a remote database like DB2.

Let’s look at the other “Checkout” transaction which was breaching during the performance spike. Here is a checkout which took 9.1 seconds and deviated significantly from its performance baseline. You can see from the screenshot below the latency or bottleneck is again coming from the DB2 database:

Hardly surprising given most application scalability issues these days still relate to data persistence between the JVM and database. So let’s drill down into the JVM for this transaction and understand what exactly is being invoked in the DB2 database:

Above is the code execution of that transaction and you immediately see 8.5 seconds of latency is spent in an EJB call which is performing an update. Let’s take a look at the invoked queries as part of that update:

Nice, a simple update query was taking 8.4 seconds, notice all the other SQL queries associated with a single execution of the “Checkout” transaction. The application during this performance spike was clearly database bound and as a result a few code changes were made overnight that reduced the amount of database calls the application was making. We had one retail e-commerce customer last year who found a similar bottleneck, a fix was applied that reduced the number of database calls per minute from 500,000 to a little under 150,000. While the problem may at first appear to be a database issue (for the DBA) it was actually application logic and the developers who were responsible for resolving the issue.

You can see in the first screenshot that application response time was stable throughout the rest of the thanksgiving period , no spikes or outages occurred for this customer and all was well. While every customer will do their best to catch performance defects in pre-production and test, sometimes its not possible to reproduce or simulate real application usage or patterns, especially in large scale high throughput production environments. This is where Application Performance Management (APM) solutions like AppDynamics can help – by monitoring your application in production so you can see whats happening. Get started today with a free 30-day trial.

Appman

2 Fast 2 Furious: When Organizations become too Agile

Taken from JAX Conference Keynote 2012 in Mainz:

Declaring yourself “Agile” no longer means you’re automatically cool or competitive. It might have in the olden days, when teams would be considered agile if they did 5 releases a year–but the word today has assumed a completely different meaning. Now, many organizations will happily admit to doing multiple releases a day. The problem is this: the majority of self-styled agile teams focus on speed, innovation and change, but very few focus on results.

This session takes a look at what happens when organizations become too agile, and how this addiction can become terminal for the business. We’ll cover real-life examples outlining the challenges and pain points of organizations striving to be agile. It will also offer top tips for dev teams to do agile the “right” way, helping them better manage change and understand the real impact that frequent releases have upon their business.

Slides available here on Slideshare.

APM vs NPM. 2nd Round K.O.

Round Two – Last time I wrote a blog comparing APM versus network-based APM tools, which I still consider NPM at it’s core regardless of what some critics and competitors claim. Let me make one thing clear though, NPM is great for equipping IT network administrators to see how fast or slow data is traveling through the pipes of their application. Unfortunately, network-based APM tools simply cannot provide App Ops granular visibility into the application runtime when isolating bottlenecks go beyond the system level and it’s final destination – the end user’s browser.

I find several of the blogs and YouTube clips from such NPM vendors quite comical as they try to throw punches at APM companies. Their arguments are centered primarily against agent-based approaches being an inadequate APM solution due to today’s fickle and distributed application architectures. It’s not like I haven’t heard it before.

The amusing thing about it…they’re completely right! In fact, we couldn’t agree more, and that’s why Jyoti Bansal founded AppDynamics to address these perennial shortcomings legacy APM vendors have been ignoring. Even the smallest businesses next to the largest enterprises have complex applications that have outpaced their App Ops teams’ current set of monitoring tools. That’s why AppDynamics is reinventing and reigniting the application performance management space by enabling IT operations to monitor complex, modern applications running in the cloud or the data center. So let me respond to those claims they’ve made.

The Claims

“Agents have high deployment and ongoing maintenance burden.”
Legacy APM: TRUE
AppDynamics: FALSE. No manual instrumentation required. It’s automatic.

“Agents are invasive which can perturb the systems being monitored.”
Legacy APM: TRUE
AppDynamics: FALSE. Our customers see less than 1-2% overhead in production. 

“Performance management vendors have over promised and under delivered for decades.”
Legacy APM: TRUE
AppDynamics: FALSE. Things are going well thanks. Check our customer list and 400% growth.

All AppDynamics. The next-gen of APM.

Example App with application performance issues

I drew a parallel in my previous post that using NPM concepts to monitor application performance is like inspecting UPS packages en-route to figure out why operations at a hub came to a screeching halt. Remember, even if the package contents is visible from afar, it doesn’t explain why the hub conveyors, which electronically guide packages to their appropriate destination chute is broken, nor can it identify why cargo operations have stalled. In other words, good luck trying to gather anything beyond the scope of the application’s infrastructure. Using network monitoring tools to collect even the most basic system health metrics such as CPU utilization, memory usage, thread pool consumption and thrashing? Time to throw in the towel.

And what about End User Monitoring?

What’s becoming just as important as being able to monitor server side processing and network time is the ability to monitor end user performance. When NPM tools are only able to see the last packet sent from the server, how does that help you understand the browser’s performance? It doesn’t since once again, this kind of analysis is only feasible higher up the stack at the Application Layer. And just to clarify when I say Application Layer, I mean application execution time, not “network process time to application” as defined by OSI Layer 7.

On the other hand, injected agents residing in that layer can insert JavaScript into the Web page to determine the execution time spent in the browser. This is becoming more of a concern for App Ops and Dev Ops now that 80-90% of the end-user response time is spent on the frontend executing JavaScript, rendering markup and stylesheets. As business logic continues it’s migration to the browser while increasing it’s processing burden, the client is looking more and more like the new server. Network monitoring tools must move to an agent-based approach if they are to truly deliver the monitoring visibility needed for the application and end user experience, otherwise their visibility will remain between a rock and a hard place.

On top of that, what about those customers running their applications in a public cloud? Are you going to convince your cloud provider to install a network appliance into their infrastructure? I highly doubt it. With AppDynamics, we have partnerships with cloud providers such as Amazon EC2, Azure, RightScale and Opsource allowing developers and operations to easily deploy AppDynamics with a flick of a switch and monitor their applications in production 24/7.

Once again, next-gen APM triumphs over NPM based application performance on not just the server side, but also the browser. AppDynamics is embracing this and fully aware of the technical and business significance of monitoring end user performance. We’re delighted to offer this kind of end-to-end visibility to our customers who will now be able to monitor application performance from the end users’ browser to the backend application tiers (databases, mainframes), all through a single pane of glass view.

Why I Joined The Leading APM Provider AppDynamics

A new year, a new iPhone and a new quarter. What else is new? How about a new company?

Last month I was fortunate enough to join a stellar marketing team at one of the fastest growing enterprise software startups in the bay area. The company you ask? AppDynamics, and did I mention we’re also the leading next generation Application Performance Management (APM) provider for modern architectures in distributed, cloud, virtualized and on-premise environments? We exceeded our targets for 2011 achieving an astonishing 400% growth in bookings. Not too shabby for being the new kid on the block in a competitive market already inundated with vendors. You have old school APM tools from megavendors like CA, HP and Compuware (was dynaTrace). Then you have the new school breed such as New Relic and AppDynamics. In fact, Gartner’s MQ lists over twenty vendors. So with such a crowded market why did I even consider such a move?

Well there’s a laundry list of reasons, but here are the top ones that come to mind.

1. Business Innovation. This is another kind of BI not just Business Intelligence. It’s really a breath of fresh air to be working with an organization that is not only obsessed with pumping out insanely great technology every few quarters or so, but also open to embracing innovative approaches to every discipline of the business including creative marketing and sales strategies. Often times enterprise software companies unabashedly attempt to cloak themselves in slideware selling a “vision” or an enterprise solution poles apart from reality. Unfortunately when it comes down to an actual evaluation, you end up having to attend a dozen meetings just to see an applicable demo, a one week to two month proof-of-concept followed by throwing millions of dollars at consulting and implementation services, which segues to my next point.

2. Ease-of-Use. This simple yet powerful concept has been repeatedly neglected or intentionally ignored by many enterprise software companies. Luckily, the Leaders of the New School such as Apple, Salesforce, Box, etc. (not Busta Rhymes group) have changed the way end users value an intuitive user interface and design. At AppDynamics, we’ve adopted a similar mindshare. “Easy” is the new world order in this industry because the managers, engineers and folks in IT operations are encountering enough complexity as it is with these modern architectures. I doubt the last thing that they want is another tool to further complicate their lives causing more frustration on the job. At the end of the day everyone is a consumer – the least common denominator – who wants to use software that helps us demystify our lives and makes us successful at our jobs (unless you’re a sadist).

Software that is easy to install, implement and use can have a tremendous impact on the bottom-line of a business. Suppose you end up rolling out a new system but end up having to spend a chunk of company change on implementation and training costs. What impact does that have on your productivity and ultimately your company’s bottom-line? Here’s an example from Avon’s Q3, 2011 earnings transcript,

“Despite extensive pre-implementation testing, we had greater than anticipated implementation challenges in the go-live. Significantly higher business complexity in this market contributed to a greater than expected level of disruption, as I said, when we went to the go-live environment.”

Many vendors make enterprise deployments akin to embarking on an IT version of manifest destiny. I’m sure you can think of a few applications in your own IT toolbox that fit the bill where at some point you ended up asking yourself, “Why can’t this be as easy as [fill in the blank with some consumer app]?”  Fig. 2. See empathetic frustrated user to your left.

That was compelling enough for me to join AppDynamics. We truly understand the business significance as to why software ought to be easy 360 degrees around especially in production. I’m not saying that the work designers and developers have to do to achieve this “Easy” goal is easy in itself. I have an unrequited love for the folks in engineering who possess the talent and perseverance in coding applications, but that doesn’t excuse a vendor from selling you a dream and then leaving you stranded to implement a nightmare all because there wasn’t enough emphasis on ease-of-use.

3. Application Performance. This one is near and dear to my heart and arguably the main reason for me to join AppDynamics. It takes me back to the challenging days and sleepless nights I endured while working on a massive global PDM implementation at LG Electronics jointly with Dassault Systemes. The year was 2008. Skynet hadn’t become self-aware yet. App Man was just A Man in the throes and woes of IT operations, and half way around the world over in Seoul, Korea I was managing juggling recurring performance issues on a weekly basis with our PMO having to answer to the beck and call of the LGE CIO. The project’s launch date had been delayed due to various complications with the implementation (that’s a whole other story). Any ideas what one of those might have entailed? If you guessed “performance”, congratulations! You’ve won! Download your free copy AppDynamics Lite.

Every week new customizations were being released from R&D back in the states, PS in Korea and SI’s sitting on the other side of the room. You could call it Agile development’s nemesis, frAgile development. The dynamic nature of our java-based environment only introduced more challenges to the performance team who were heads-down trying to reverse engineer someone else’s code and refactor it using APM tools that just didn’t provide us with the full visibility we needed to comprehensively profile and diagnose application performance issues (using JenniferSoft). In fact, one of the consultants on our team ended up creating his own profiler to expose these blind spots, but what we really needed was a next-generation APM tool that would visually map and connect the dots for us like the one below.

Then we ran into another stumbling block after we completed migrating legacy data to a new “production” environment. When the time came to retest the entire set of performance use cases in this new environment we experienced all kinds of performance regressions. Since everyone was collaborating so well with each other for over the past two years, we all cheerfully marched forward without any finger pointing as to what the root cause was. Ok, so it wasn’t that utopian. Fortunately, because of everyone’s undying commitment and personal sacrifices, the project went live successfully in mid 2010 with over 2,000 users visiting the system per day. In hindsight, we could have easily saved a month’s worth had we used a better tool thereby eliminating the usual suspects.

From that experience I’ve come to appreciate and understand how business-critical managing application performance is for any company. Now I am on a mission to spread the word of AppDynamics to help companies manage rapidly evolving, distributed environments.

Buckle up 2012, we’re just getting started.

Gartner publishes 2011 Magic Quadrant for Application Performance Monitoring

On Tuesday, Gartner announced this year’s Magic Quadrant for Application Performance Monitoring (APM).   I’ll make a few observations from reading the MQ and then suggest 3 additional criteria that APM buyers should consider to make informed buying decisions.

APM demand is strongThe research report started with an analysis of the APM market growth at 15% year-over-year and $2 billion in total market spend.  These facts reflect what we see every day – the market for APM is very strong and benefits from the high growth in web-driven commerce.  Web apps just can’t be slow.

One key APM growth driver is that modern applications have become more difficult to monitor – with more moving parts and a higher rate of change. Gartner summarizes this nicely in their market overview:

“Unfortunately, at just the moment when executives have become keen about imposing an application-centric view of the world on IT operations, applications have become far more difficult to monitor; in general, architectures have become more modular, redundant, distributed and dynamic, often laying down the particular twists and turns that a code execution path could take at the latest possible moment.”